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Who Else Wants To Be On the Twinkie Diet?

 

Have you heard the news?

Facebook has. Lots of tweets are being sent. It is all over the internet.

A Professor of  Human Nutrition at Kansas State University, Mark Haub, went on a Twinkie diet. Yes. You read that right. A Twinkie diet.

And guess what? He lost 27 pounds.

Let me repeat that. He lost 27 pounds!!!!!!

He ate one Twinkie, nutty bar, or powdered donuts every three hours in place of regular meals. For variety he ate some Doritos chips, sugary cereals and Oreos, too.

In addition he took a multivitamin and a protein shake daily. At meals with his family he ate vegetables, usually a can of green beans or a few stalks of celery.

His premise: That in weight loss, pure calorie counting is what matters most — not the nutritional value of the food.

The premise held up: On his “convenience store diet,” he shed 27 pounds in two months.

For a class project, Haub limited himself to less than 1,800 calories a day. A man of Haub’s pre-dieting size usually consumes about 2,600 calories daily. So he followed a basic principle of weight loss: He consumed significantly fewer calories than he burned.

His body mass index went from 28.8, considered overweight, to 24.9, which is normal. He now weighs 174 pounds.

But you might expect other indicators of health would have suffered. Not so.

Haub’s “bad” cholesterol, or LDL, dropped 20 percent and his “good” cholesterol, or HDL, increased by 20 percent. He reduced the level of triglycerides, which are a form of fat, by 39 percent. [Emphais mine] 

Keep in mind, I am not a dietician or a nutritionist. However, I have often said it is less what we eat than how much we eat. It is portion size that matters most.

Of course, restaurants do not see it that way. They keep shoving bigger and bigger plates of food in front of our faces. And I mean all restaurants not just fast food places. For them it is all about P.R.O.F.I.T.

Now I am not suggesting in any way shape or form you go on a Twinkie diet. I know I would not. Ever. First of all, there are just way too many tasty, delicious, scrumptious foods out there and I want to eat as many different ones as possible. Otherwise I would become B.O.R.E.D. I crave variety!!

Professor Haub does not recommend that anyone go on this diet either. “I’m not geared to say this is a good thing to do,” he said. “I’m stuck in the middle. I guess that’s the frustrating part. I can’t give a concrete answer. There’s not enough information to do that,” he said.

As for his diet, Haub says:

“I wish I could say the outcomes are unhealthy. I wish I could say it’s healthy. I’m not confident enough in doing that. That frustrates a lot of people. One side says it’s irresponsible. It is unhealthy, but the data doesn’t say that.”

You can read the full article, including a day’s sample ‘menu,’ by clicking here.

This is certainly very interesting and intriguing. I am sure we will hear a lot more about this over the next few tears.

Would you go on a diet like this? Why or Why not? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.
Featured Recipe    Broccoli with Buttery Lemon Crunch

Keeping with the theme this week, this is another of my favorite Thanksgiving side dishes.

The cranberry sauce I shared last time I have been making for at least a dozen years or more; since the late 80’s or early 90’s. The recipe I share with you today I have been making since the early 1970’s. Almost 40 years. My how time flies!!!

And I have no clue as to where it came from.  And I have changed it a bit over the years anyway. One, these days I steam the broccoli, and I add lemon juice to the butter I toss the broccoli in. I use more garlic too.

UPDATE: I wrote the previous paragraph yesterday (11-10-10.) It bugged me all day long that I could not remember where I got a recipe I like so much and have used so often. So when I went to bed last night, after running through my gratitude list, I put my subconscious mind to work and told it to make me remember where I got this recipe. Voilá. When I woke up this morning, there it was vaguely entering consciousness. 

It was from an HP Cook Book. These little gems are out of print now.

I used to have several of these HP cookbooks, but I only have one left now, Cookery For 1 or 2. (I shared a Pork Fried Rice recipe with you from this book.) This morning when I first woke up and it came to me, I thought the name of the book was Easy Entertaining or something like that.

I did an internet search and there is an HP title, Cookery for Entertaining. But I am not absolutely, positively certain that is the book. But the recipe does come from an HP cook book. Mystery solved. Sigh. Now I feel better!

This is what you will need for about 6 servings:

1 large bunch broccoli  (1-1½ pounds)

4 tablespoons butter

½ cup dry bread crumbs

1-2 tablespoons grated lemon peel

3-4 tablespoons butter

1-2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 or 2 large garlic clove(s) crushed in a garlic press or finely minced

Salt and pepper to taste

Here is what you do:

Wash the broccoli and cut the thick part of the stems off the bottom.

Cut the broccoli into large slices. I cut mine into 5 stems. I could have cut a few more stems. But I wanted five. You will be able to see natural places to cut. They are the places where you can see some space. See the stalk on the bottom center of the picture below. That is what I am talking about.

If you do not want the roccolli stalks cut the broccoli into flowerettes. Recipe works well either way.

There are three things we need to get ready now before we cook the broccoli, because once the broccoli is cooked things will move fast.

1. Using a lemon zester, like the one we used for the Cranberry Pear Sauce, zest the lemon. (Remember to wash the lemon first.)

2. Put the garlic through a garlic press or finely mince.

3. Squeeze about 2 tablespoons of lemon juice.

You could start cooking the broccoli now. But I don’t. Since I like my broccoli crisp-tender I don’t want to over cook it. So as not to worry about it I complete this next step first.

Melt 4 tablespoons of butter in a pan…………..

…………….add the breadcrumbs. Turn up the heat slightly and stir frequently until crumbly and lightly browned.

 

Stir most of the lemon peel into the crumbs. Reserve a few for garnish.

**Sorry, no picture. I forgot to take it.  Mea culpa. Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.**

Place the broccoli stalks in the steaming basket over the hot water. Cover and let steam till crisp tender, or to taste, about 8-12 minutes. I let my nose be my guide. When I first begin to smell the aroma of broccoli I know the broccoli is done or nearly so.

Melt the rest of the butter in a skillet. Add the garlic and sauté for a minute or two. Add the lemon juice too and mix it all together.

Add the cooked broccoli and gently turn with tongs until all sides are coated in the garlic butter. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Heat a dish in the microwave and remove. Place the broccoli on the hot dish. Pour any remaining garlic-lemon butter over the broccoli. Top with the lemony butter crumbs and the reserved lemon peel.

Bon Appetit!!!

Cost

1 large bunch broccoli                      $2.22             

4 tablespoons butter                        $0.60

½ cup dry bread crumbs                  $0.28

1-2 tablespoons lemon peel              $0.66

3-4 tablespoons butter                     $0.60

1-2 tablespoons lemon juice             in cost of lemon above

1-2 large garlic clove                       $0.10                          

Salt and pepper to taste

Total cost = $4.46
Cost per person = $0.74

Quote of the Day

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

Nelson Mandela 

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6 comments to Who Else Wants To Be On the Twinkie Diet?

  • The taste-bud part of me would love to lose weight by eating Twinkies and Ding-Dongs every three hours. But I’ve been brain-washed (“educated”) into believing they’re unhealthy. So that part of me resists the temptation.

    As you know, I’m interested in how ideas about health have changed over the last half century. My reluctance to eat Twinkies – which I did consume in my twenties — is an example of how my behavior has been influenced by changing conceptions of what’s healthy and unhealthy. I’m sure I’m not the only one.

    I don’t know if there’s specific scientific evidence for this, but I do believe that eating mainly junk food, supplemented by a vitamin pill and a can of string beans, is nutritionally unsound — enough so that one would suffer health-wise as one got older and possibly die sooner as a result. I couldn’t find the glycemic index of Twinkies on the web – only that it’s higher than brown rice. But eating exclusively carbohydrates every three hours is a sure-fire way to invite diabetes.

  • By “brainwashing” (vs. education) I don’t mean to imply that health information is a bad thing. On the whole it’s not. It’s just that it sometimes feels like brainwashing because there’s so much of it in the media.

    And it’s not always right. The government made a big push to educate the public on reducing total fat in the diet. This was before we understood that not all fats are bad for us. The result was a huge increase in carbohydrate consumption, which we now know is definitely not good for us.

    We can’t expect science to have definitive answers that never change. That’s not what science is. But that’s a good reason not to jump on the latest health fad.

  • mini cheescake recipes

    The taste-bud part of me would love to lose weight by eating Twinkies and Ding-Dongs every three hours. But I’ve been brain-washed (“educated”) into believing they’re unhealthy. So that part of me resists the temptation.

    As you know, I’m interested in how ideas about health have changed over the last half century. My reluctance to eat Twinkies – which I did consume in my twenties — is an example of how my behavior has been influenced by changing conceptions of what’s healthy and unhealthy. I’m sure I’m not the only one.

    I don’t know if there’s specific scientific evidence for this, but I do believe that eating mainly junk food, supplemented by a vitamin pill and a can of string beans, is nutritionally unsound — enough so that one would suffer health-wise as one got older and possibly die sooner as a result. I couldn’t find the glycemic index of Twinkies on the web – only that it’s higher than brown rice. But eating exclusively carbohydrates every three hours is a sure-fire way to invite diabetes.

  • […] you remember a few months ago I ran a post on the Twinkie Diet. That study also showed it is less WHAT I eat and more HOW MUCH of it I eat that determines whether […]

  • […] the Twinkie Diet I wrote about last year? This was the story about Profesor of Human Nutrition at Kansas State […]